Growing fast

We have been in Texas for a few days, so I haven’t reported on the bluebirds. They have grown a lot. Feathers are developing and they are to the stage that they perceive me as a predator when I open the box. Instead of opening their mouths, they get down into the nest as far as they can and remain motionless.

Click photos to enlarge.

Daddy was glad to see the worm man when we returned home.  I went out on the patio with my bowl of cereal this morning and Daddy was immediately on the mealworm feeder.  He knows the routine. After gobbling down a couple, Daddy fed the babies. I can hear them chirping now when the parents come near the box.   A pic of Daddy with a flaps-down landing on the entrance to the box.

The baby mockingbirds are growing fast, too. The parents are much more wary of me than the bluebirds.   At first they wouldn’t bring bugs to the babies if I were on the patio. But, they have gained confidence that I am not a threat and will come to the nest now. They perch and watch me for a couple of minutes, but if I remain seated, they go into the nest just a few feet from me.   Throw in all the other birds that visit this red dirt hill and I have quite the nature show.

Second brood summary:

  • 07 May  First egg laid
  • 08 May  Second egg laid
  • 09 May  Third egg laid
  • 14 May   Incubation began
  • 25 May   Two eggs hatched, one remaining
  • 29 May  Unhatched egg removed. Unfertilized.
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About lindell dillon

Lindell Dillon is retired and lives in Norman, OK. He grew up in Duncan, attended Cameron College and graduated from the University of Oklahoma. His interests include photography, nature, birding, and investing. Oklahoma Master Naturalist, alumnus Norman Police Department Citizens Academy.
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2 Responses to Growing fast

  1. Those mockingbird babies look very hungry 🙂

    • lindell dillon says:

      The adult mockingbirds are excellent bug catchers. They are bringing in large grasshoppers now, big meals for little birds.

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